Good Shepherd Communities

Bb Cornets
B-flat Cornets

On Saturday, March 31, 2017, The 1st Nebraska performed for the good people living in the Good Shepherd Communities in Blair, Nebraska. They set us up in their chapel, which proved to be a wonderful space in which to perform. The aesthetics were beautiful and the atmosphere was friendly.

We debuted two new selections on Saturday. The first was an arrangement of two Stephen Foster songs, “I Dream of Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair” and “Beautiful Dreamer.” These were sung by E-flat Cornetist James Lund. James has a beautiful tenor voice, and he did a marvelous job interpreting the two songs. During the mid-nineteenth century Stephen Foster was America’s foremost composer of popular songs, and Jeanie and Dreamer are among his best known.

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We also premiered “Beauregard’s Retreat from the Battle of Shiloh.” This is a battle scene depiction for narrator and band of the entire conflict. Battle scenes were popular during the nineteenth century, and the best known is Beethoven’s “Wellington’s Victory.” General Pierre G. T. Beauregard was a well ¬†known Confederate general from Louisiana, who was in command of the troops that shelled Ft. Sumter, and was executive officer of the southern troops at Shiloh. When the commanding general Albert Sidney Johnston was killed Beauregard ordered the hasty retreat of the Confederate army leaving the Union army, under Gen. U. S. Grant, with the victory. The battle scene describes the night before the battle, the attack, and the eventual retreat. There are some humorous descriptions of Beauregard’s retreat in the final movement. We selected this piece because of its novelty and because the 1st Nebraska Infantry played a role in the eventual defeat of the southern army.

Introducing Song

Posted on our video page is “Louisville March” recorded at Saturday’s performance. Check it out!

We were pleased to see some friends from Blair who attended the concert, and to perform for the appreciative audience at Good Shepherd.

Check our 2017 performance schedule and come out to hear one of programs.

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Kicking Off 2017

Happy New Year, Friends! Here’s hoping that 2017 is a wonderful year for us all.

1st Nebraska holds its first rehearsal of 2017 this Sunday at 2 pm. We’ll get a first crack at new songs for our program. We’re going to close with Home, Sweet Home in place of Tenting on the Old Campground, and replace Freischutz Quickstep with Ben Bolt. We’re adding Louisville March so that we can demonstrate the formal and stylistic differences between marches and quicksteps.

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The big opera tune for 2017 is “Coronation March from Le Prophete” by Giacomo Meyerbeer. This is a very regal and melodic piece suitable for the crowning of a monarch.

One of our E-flat Cornet players is also a wonderful tenor, so I’m arranging Stephen Fosters’ I Dream of Jeanine with the Light Brown Hair and Beautiful Dreamer to feature him. We’re also going to program a new edition “Washington Greys” based upon the parts of the 4th New Hampshire (Port Royal) Band.

Right now it looks like the first performance of the year will be in Elkhorn, NE on March 4.

Old Dog Tray

Stephen C. Foster (1826-1864) is sometimes known as “The Father of American Music” for the many popular and sentimental songs that he wrote in the mid 1800s. Born in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, Foster lived many years in Pittsburgh and wrote several songs for the Christy Minstrels who through their tours spread Foster’s songs far and wide. Among the songs made popular by Christy were “Camptown Races” (1850), “Nelly Bly” (1850), “Old Folks at Home” (known also as “Swanee River”, 1851), “My Old Kentucky Home” (1853), “Old Dog Tray” (1853), and “Jeanie With the Light Brown Hair” (1854), written for his wife Jane Denny McDowell.

“Old Dog Tray” shows Foster’s love of dogs, especially in the words to the chorus: “Old dog Tray’s ever faithful; Grief cannot drive him away; He’s gentle, he is kind, I’ll never, never find A better friend than old dog Tray.”

This arrangement comes from Brass Band Journal published in 1854. It was recorded at Grace University on August 23, 2015.